Thursday, October 04, 2007

Brown: The Microsoft of british politics

This piece by Potlach is very good.

Via Mick, who has summarised it here.

Choose which link to follow for yourself.

3 comments:

mikeovswinton said...

Paulie, cut out all this Gordon Brown stuff. There's serious things to write about going on, don't you realise. Like the Diana inquest. BTW, had an interesting chat about the origins of the soulie phrase "Keep the Faith" with an old mate of Dave Godin's (RIP) the other day. Now THAT is serious stuff

Paulie said...

Dave Godin? There's a name I've not heard in a v. long time.

I've just looked him up on Wikipedia. That 4 volume compilation looks worth having doesn't it?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Godin

So, go on, spill? What's the origin of Keep the faith? Didn't it have some Black Power origins? I always thought that the Northern Soul clenched fist symbol was some kind of superficial appopriation of the same?

mikeovswinton in the North,baby said...

Well, my sarcastic comment on journalistic political hype set some hares running! Point 1; Dave Godin's Deep Soul Treasures (taken from the vaults). Yep, worth having. 1 or 2 of them are in my collection. Point 2. The origins of "Keep the Faith". We discussed this because we were listening to a Garnett Mimms compilation DG had done the liner notes for. I suggested that we scroll to "As long as I have you", and my friend (who knew DG in the Soul City record shop and Tamla Motown Appreciation Society days) said "My God that's Northern" or words to that effect. DG used to sign articles with the phrase KTF. Our conclusion was that is was probably an African American Church saying. It could have a Black Power connection, but we did note its use on the 1967 song by Jackie Wilson (thats the Great Jackie Wilson) "I'm the one to do it", produced by Carl Davis, and very popular in Northern Soul circles. The phrase on the song is "Baby, keep your faith, because sadness can be replaced." That's perhaps a touch early for Black Power, and the song was possibly written even earlier. As to the superficial appropriation - yes, more than likely. You can still get the "Northern Soul Keep the Faith"/ clenched fist shoulder bags at Cafe Pop on Oldham Street in Manchester's Northern Quarter.