Thursday, December 22, 2005

7/7 public enquiry? Blogging as therapy?

Rachel from North London was one of the people who was caught up in the London bombings last summer. Her blog digs around a lot of the issues - those of forgiveness and attempting to understand what happened - why it happened, and reflections on the 'victimhood'.

She posted a on December the 14th supporting calls for a public enquiry about 7th July bombings. I've disagreed with her in the comments thread if you're interested. But, among her many posts (and I think she is one of the most prolific bloggers I've come across for a while), she links to a piece about blogging as therapy.

"About one-half of bloggers (48.7%) keep a blog because it serves as a form of therapy, and 40.8% say it helps them keep in touch with family and friends. Just 16.2% say they are interested in journalism, and 7.5% want to expose political information. Few see blogging as their ticket to fame."

I'm surprised no-one answered that, if they didn't blog, they'd probably go out and throttle some one who has a deep-seated need to be throttled.

5 comments:

Tomodachi said...

"I'm surprised no-one answered that, if they didn't blog, they'd probably go out and throttle some one who has a deep-seated need to be throttled."

This is very true. But i'm sure you have, at some point, felt the need to throttle the owner of another blog for a great many reasons.

Something that has of course never happened to me *cough, looks at floor, adjusts tie*

Thank the lord (if that's allowed?) for blogosphere anonymity.

Rachel said...

Paulie, if you read the Sunday Tines article which is on the links on the right you will see why I and some of the other survivors want a public enquiry.

The article is here http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2092-1937542,00.html.

Perhaps you would like to read it rather than simply assuming that I am after a public enquiry because this is some kind of therapy for me and I want 'closure'.

You might also see my posts about conspiracy theorists, so you can assure yourself that I do not think it was some kind of 'black ops nonsense.'

And - guess what? I have actually taken a rather close interest in the investigation since my train blew up in July. And - fancy that - I am already aware of the transcript and interview of Mohammed Siddique Khan. Isn't that amazing! It's almost as if I have an interest in the news and politics, rather than 'blogging prolifically about victimhood' - as you claim on your post on your blog about me. ( Have you actually read my blog?)

But, anyway, thanks ever so for pointing it out to me ( the bomber's video).

Also Paulie, in response to this

'Rachel. You say that "It is the public who were the targets, not the politicians, Mr Blair."
Why are you saying this? '

*Cough*

Because Blair does not use public transport?

And the attacks and the failed attacks in July were aimed at public transport and those who use it?


That last actually made me laugh out loud. Sheesh. *rolls eyes*

brockway said...

"About one-half of bloggers (48.7%) keep a blog because it serves as a form of therapy, and 40.8% say it helps them keep in touch with family and friends. Just 16.2% say they are interested in journalism, and 7.5% want to expose political information. Few see blogging as their ticket to fame."

A lot of blogs I've read appear to be motivated by their owners' absolute conviction that their views are somehow important. So where's the egomania percentage?

Paulie said...

Rachel,

First off, we appear to have got off on the wrong foot. I linked to a comment that was critical of a particular post. The rest of the post on my own blog (about yours) was intended to be complimentary. If you read it again, you'll see that I wasn't suggesting that you were therapy-blogging and my reference to 'victimhood' referred to ... a post entitled 'Victimhood' on your own blog.

Re-reading it, I can see how that interpretation (therapy-blogging) could be made. But it wasn't the intention.

I'd also read the Times article. I know journalists well enough to know that a sympathetic article reporting a call for an enquiry would be read through the same lenses that the people in your comment boxes read them:

- Blame Blair
- Blame the war in Iraq
- Ignore the real culprits - the bombers.

There is no question that the emergency services can learn plenty from July 7th. There's no question that infrastructure and communications can be improved to accomodate such an eventuality. But it is hardly the remit of a public enquiry, and any journalist (who should know what such enquiries are really for) is just being mischeivous by not pointing this out.

But your comments boxes are full of comments from people who are quite explicit - they detest the current government and it's foreign policy - either from a right-wing or left-wing perspective.

Finally, regarding your comment that "...it is the public who were the targets, not the politicians, Mr Blair.":

You can laugh all you like. But you are, in effect, claiming that Blair isn't supporting your call for an enquiry because, as a non-Tube user he doesn't care about people who do use the system. Taking your argument to any logical conclusion, he should give in to calls for a public enquiry whenever anyone asks him to.

That is a cheap shot that undermines your argument. If you are really suggesting that Blair is happy to ignore the lessons of how the July bombings were handled, then say so.

MatGB said...

I meant to comment on this one ages ago, ah well.

What those figures indicate is that the majority of bloggers are "normal" people just talking about their lives.

Sometimes it's incredibly well written, othertimes it's trash. Mostly it's trash if we're honest. Then there are the pet bloggers, the hobby bloggers, the tech bloggers, etc.

I actually think that to have 16% interested in journalism and 7.5% wanting to expose political stuff is quite impressive considering. For example, there are 2 million plus active Livejournal users, that's blogging, but very little of it is political.

I blog in order to vent, especially about politics; it's my degree specialty, but irrelevent to my job, so I just go off on one when I feall like it. That was the idea, anyway. I'm getting more into it as I go.